Monday, September 21, 2020

Storm-Lynx semifinal postponed due to inconclusive test results

The Seattle Storm-Minnesota Lynx semifinal game Sunday was postponed after Storm players received inconclusive COVID-19 test results. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
The Seattle Storm-Minnesota Lynx semifinal game Sunday was postponed after Storm players received inconclusive COVID-19 test results. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
The Seattle Storm-Minnesota Lynx semifinal game Sunday was postponed after Storm players received inconclusive COVID-19 test results. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.

The WNBA took the unprecedented step Sunday of postponing a semifinal playoff game, due to inconclusive COVID-19 test results.

About 35 minutes prior to the scheduled tipoff between the No. 1 seed Seattle Storm and No. 4 Minnesota Lynx, the league announced that game one of the series would be postponed due to “inconclusive…test results today for players from the Seattle Storm….out of an abundance of caution.”

The game was to air after the first semifinal match up between the Connecticut Sun and Las Vegas Aces. Instead, commissioner Cathy Engelbert explained on camera that she received the inconclusive results prior to the Storm’s departure from their hotel. She rode the bus with them and broke the news in person.

“Especially when there are multiple players, we really can’t take a chance to expose the bubble to any kind of community spread,” Engelbert said. “We need to see, we need to get more data, we need to get more testing, to see if we have an issue or not. So we decided to postpone the game.”

Those whose test results were inconclusive have been put in isolation.

Players have been tested daily since entering the WNBA bubble July 6. At least three from different teams received inconclusive test results during the course of the season, but in each case they were reactivated within days after then testing negative.

Engelbert said the entire Seattle team will be tested again tonight, and then tomorrow, with those testing inconclusive receiving additional testing.

“Hopefully we’ll get good data back the next 24-48 hours and be back on the court with those two teams for game one on Tuesday, but we’ve got to keep assessing the data,” she said.

The most challenging aspect of conducting the bubble season, Engelbert said, is that COVID-19 testing begins anew each day.

“It’s about keeping the bubble safe and making sure there’s no community spread,” she said. “The purpose of the testing program and protocols is pulling someone out before there’s a spread.”

The WNBA is committed to honoring the data.

“While we’d like to have a game right now…you have to follow the data and the science,” Engelbert said. “So far everything has worked in bubble because we’ve followed the science.”

Patience is key for the league.

“The virus is so unpredictable that it takes time to get….and evaluate those results,” Engelbert said. “This was the right thing to do today.”

Aces and Sun bring toughness to the semifinals

Brionna Jones fights for positioning under the basket. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
Brionna Jones fights for positioning under the basket. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
Brionna Jones fights for positioning under the basket. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.

Nobody expected the Connecticut Sun to be in the WNBA playoff semifinals.

Neither the Las Vegas Aces, who finished with the league’s best record, nor the Sun, who lost their first five games, were picked to be playoff contenders before the season started.

Yet here they are, beginning a best-of-five series on Sunday. In the regular season, the Aces dominated Connecticut by 21 and 15 points, respectively, in their two match ups.

Led by WNBA MVP A’ja Wilson’s 23 points, seven rebounds, and outstanding interior defense, Las Vegas has a veteran squad with five players averaging double-figure scoring. Those five also average an astonishing 49 percent field goal percentage.

Angel McCoughtry, a veteran all-star in her first year with the Aces, is second in scoring at 14.4 ppg. Although that is below the averages of her years as the go-to player in Atlanta, her efficiency is greatly improved with Wilson carrying that weight. McCoughtry is shooting 51.8 percent from the floor, and 47.1 from three-point range. At 34, she may be a step slower, but she remains adept at creating her own shot when needed.

Las Vegas also sports the best bench in the WNBA, a choice coach Bill Laimbeer made to bring key players into the game like a sneak attack, then keeping them in the mix for significant minutes.

Leading the bench group is Dearica Hamby, the 2019 Sixth Player of the Year, and even better this season. She chips in 13 points and seven boards a game, and can step out and hit the three at a 47.4 percent clip. Also off the bench is the much-improved Jackie Young, who can shake up a game with her athleticism and energy.

Add the sharp-shooting potential of Kayla McBride, and a supporting group that includes Danielle Robinson at guard and Carolyn Swords in the paint, and the result is a team that leads the league in points, rebounds, and total free throws.

But Connecticut coach Curt Miller highlights another aspect of this Las Vegas team.

A'ja Wilson blocks a shot. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
A’ja Wilson blocks a shot. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.

“The big thing with Vegas is they out-tough everyone, right?” he said. “You have the reigning MVP.”

“You have a lot of great pieces around that, and the record-setting bench. And so they just keep coming at you with waves of people. So we won these first two rounds a lot because of toughness but the benchmark right now in the bubble season for toughness is Vegas, so we’re gonna have to raise our toughness even to another level. It’s going to be a really physical game.”

The Aces will be well-rested after a stretch in which they seized the No. 1 seed with a league best 9-1 finish to the season.

Facing them is a Sun team – seeded seventh – without a chance on paper. They finished the regular season 10-12, and after a mid-season surge, were just 5-5 in their last ten games. In reality, however, they were designed to be a playoff team, according to their coach.

“When we went into free agency….we set out with the goal in mind to bring in some championship pedigree, and more veterans,” Miller said.

Those veterans included DeWanna Bonner and Briann January, both eleventh-year players who have won championships, to add to the established game of Alyssa Thomas and Jasmine Thomas, who helped lead the team to last year’s Finals.

The playoff pressure is “what we’re built for,” Miller said. “We’re built for this time. They’ve won. They’ve been here. It’s not too big for them.”

Connecticut has done everything to validate that claim in the playoffs, with decisive wins over Chicago and Los Angeles. They have dominated the boards, with 22 offensive rebounds and 18 more total rebounds than their opponents. They have gotten to the line 39 times in those games, and made 37 of them. They have controlled their turnovers, with twelve against the Sky and just eight against a very good defensive team in the Sparks. The Sun are 10-1 on the season when they turn it over fewer than 13 times.

A coordinated and smothering defense has been central to those wins. Alyssa Thomas, Bonner, and Brionna Jones have ruled the paint, grabbing 61 rebounds in the two games.

DeWanna Bonner goes up and under for a basket. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.
DeWanna Bonner goes up and under for a basket. Photo by Stephen Gosling/NBAE via Getty Images.

At the same time, Alyssa Thomas, Briann January, and Jasmine Thomas (playing through the pain of plantar fasciitis) have harassed and shut down some of the best shooting guards in the league.

Through the 0-5 start, Miller said his “team stuck together, built relationships, built chemistry off the court through that losing streak through our early times, as we got better.”

“Chemistry off the court, [and] our chemistry started to improve on the court. And we hung our hat on the defensive end,” he said. “While we want our offense to be better, we hung our hat on the defensive end and they bought into it.”

The offense does seem to be getting better at just the right time. All five starters scored in double figures against Los Angeles, and the team hit 9 of 20 threes – well above their average. (Only Las Vegas shot fewer threes for the season.)

The offensive improvement in part comes from moving the ball to get better, higher percentage shots.

I just think we have multiple weapons out on the floor,” January said after the Sparks win. “We are at our best when the ball’s moving.”

“And we knew, coming into this game . . . the way they play defense they load up the floor so we needed to get the ball moving to get good shots. We executed great. We saw the weak side, we got the ball moving. You know, we still had some stagnant moments, but we were able to get our self out of it we talked through it and we, we were able to see the right, the next, option, which was usually there and swing the ball.”

Alyssa Thomas has been the driving force for the team on both sides of the ball, just as she was in their Finals run. She has averaged 23.5 points, 10 rebounds, 6.5 assists, and 1.5 steals in the playoffs, while playing nearly 40 minutes a game. Miller calls her the best defender in the league. Eleven of her 20 boards are on the offensive glass. Her focus is second to none this time of year, perhaps best shown by a career 62 percent free throw shooter hitting 13 of 14 in the playoffs.

Bonner has also been outstanding in these two games, as she has all year. She has averaged a double-double, and her length and quickness allows her, like Alyssa Thomas, to defend guards on the perimeter.

The Sun are a team peeking at the right time, but they still enter the semifinals as serious underdogs. It is a position they like.

“No one is going to pick us to win,” Miller said. “We’re going to use that disrespect.”

Kayla McBride gets past the defense. Photo by Ned Dishman/NBAE via Getty Images.
Kayla McBride gets past the defense. Photo by Ned Dishman/NBAE via Getty Images.

“We’re going to use that chip. Our players felt like no one thought out there that we could beat LA. And we’re gonna we’re gonna use it – even if it’s not happening. We’re definitely going to use the disrespect card and believe we are truly the underdogs going into this series.”

There is no question that Connecticut should lose in three. But then again, no one wins a game on paper. Both teams will play through the paint. Both teams will defend physically. The Sun have surprised the league with their playoff success. The Aces have exceeded every pre-season expectation all year. It could well be a great series.

A’ja Wilson wins WNBA Most Valuable Player award

WNBA commissioner Cathy Engelbert hugs Las Vegas Aces forward A'ja Wilson after presenting her with the 2020 Most Valuable Player award. Photo courtesy of the Las Vegas Aces.
WNBA commissioner Cathy Engelbert hugs Las Vegas Aces forward A'ja Wilson after presenting her with the 2020 Most Valuable Player award. Photo courtesy of the Las Vegas Aces.
WNBA commissioner Cathy Engelbert hugs Las Vegas Aces forward A’ja Wilson after presenting her with the 2020 Most Valuable Player award. Photo courtesy of the Las Vegas Aces.

A’ja Wilson of the Las Vegas Aces won the WNBA Most Valuable Player award Thursday, receiving 43 of 47 first place media votes. Breanna Stewart of the Seattle Storm was second, with two votes, and Courtney Vandersloot of the Chicago Sky received the remaining first place vote.

The 6-4 Wilson led the league in blocks with 44 (2 bpg), was second in scoring (20.5 ppg), and sixth in total rebounds (188, 8.5 rpg), while leading her team to the league’s number one seed in the playoffs.

Wilson won Rookie of the Year in 2018, but coach Bill Laimbeer emphasized how much she had grown since then as a player, and especially, as a leader.

What makes Wilson special, he said, is “her willingness to be a leader now. You know when she first got here, it was unclear whether – what her path held as far as leading the team.”

“Last year she went through a lot of emotional struggles with it. It affected her play. But this year, she came with that mindset of ‘Okay this is my basketball team. I have a responsibility,'” Laimbeer said.

“And she will tell you today, and any day you listen to her now, that she understands what being a professional basketball player is, especially in this environment we’re in, and she will tell you she is a professional basketball player. And she will only get better. She will work on her game every year, she’ll improve in every part of her game.”

Wilson was unquestionably the leader of the Aces in 2020, even though the starting lineup included veterans like Angel McCoughtry and Danielle Robinson.

She said that leadership came to her slowly.

“I think it’s something that I had to grow into, and I had to figure it out. I think that’s the biggest thing, and I don’t even know what I was figuring out. But I figured it out,” Wilson said.

“I think it’s just knowing not only that my team needs me, but every time. . . . Like they need me every possession, every time, and I have to be there, no matter what. And I think that’s something that I had to learn and grow and . . . trust myself in a lot of situations.”

Wilson said it was a process.

“There’ve been times where I might have doubted myself or been down because I feel like I should have did a certain thing a certain way, but that’s not the case,” she said. “I just had to honestly just, one, let the game come to me and two, just trust myself and trust others around me.”

Wilson has taken that lesson to heart, and has been a model of consistency. In 22 games this season, she has scored 20 or more points 14 times. She has scored fewer than 17 points just three times, all still double-digit outings. In seven games she has logged a double-double, and she has grabbed fewer than seven rebounds just four times. She has blocked at least one shot in 21 of 22.

Ordinarily, the MVP learns of the award via a phone call, and the commissioner presents the trophy later, during a playoff game. But many things are different in this bubble year. Commissioner Cathy Englebert showed up at an Aces team meeting to surprise Wilson with the award, and the 24-year-old cried.

“I was the underdog coming into the season,” Wilson said. “We were the underdog coming into this season. And just for us to play the way that we’ve been playing and to prove a lot of people wrong . . . This is how you change people’s outlook and the look of everything and how they may think now. You can’t count everybody out.”

In a light moment, nine-year-old WNBA reporter Pepper Persley reminded Wilson that she had called winning the NCAA tournament “like getting a giant bowl of ice cream,” and asked how the MVP award compared.

Wilson smiled and said, “Oh man! I think it’s now like four giant bowls of ice cream, we can say that! I think that is like the equivalent right now of . . . just the feelings. I can’t even put into words how happy and how grateful I really am.”

The ice cream would be strawberry.

Wilson and Las Vegas play their first playoff game on Sunday, as they take on the Connecticut Sun.

 

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